TweetReach Blog

The Week in Social Analytics #143

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

This week it’s a lot about content marketing. 

Discomfort (And Content Marketing) Should Be at the Core of Your Communication Strategy [from Business2Community; written by Greg Hassel]

“The key to growth in 2015 for integrated marketing and communication firms and the individuals that comprise them will continue to be stepping out of traditional comfort zones. That may be embracing content marketing or it may be learning and becoming skilled in an area that’s not ‘sexy.’ But as the Leadership Now blog post states: ‘We can put ourselves into an uncomfortable position or, in time, it will be thrust upon us—and not on our terms.’”

Your 16-Point Content Publishing Checklist [from Convince & Convert; written by Arnie Kuenn]

Never hurts to have a reliable checklist to run down before a piece of content goes live.

Content Creators: Enough with the Boring [from Spin Sucks; written by Lindsay Bell]

“Learn this from Jim Henson: As a content creator, you must let go of fear. And you also must open your eyes to the world around you.

Being bombarded as we are daily with images and videos, blog posts and articles, start-ups and new high-tech gadgets, it’s easy to fall into the ‘that’s not cool, hip, innovative, edgy enough’ trap.

Don’t allow that trap to paralyze your content efforts. “

Why Your Blog Is Not Adding Business Value, and What You Can Do About It [from Marketing Profs; written by Jawad Khan]

“However, for your business blog to work effectively, you need to have a clear blogging objective that’s part of a solid content creation and promotion strategy.

If your content has real value for your readers, they will become not only loyal subscribers of your blog but also your most effective source of word-of-mouth marketing.”

Three Approaches to Effective Brand Storytelling [from Spin Sucks; written by Laura Petrolino]

“Our world is made up of stories—the stories we tell ourselves and those we hear from others. And those stories control how we view the world.

As communicators trying to create effective messages, we must understand how these stories affect our target consumer.

Also, how we can create and contribute stories to help our messaging resonate and integrate into their preexisting world view.”

9 Tips For Taking Top-Notch Smartphone Photos [from Business2Community; written by Lisa Furgison]

“Practice makes perfect and variety helps. If you take two or three shots of the same product in a different setting, you’re bound to get a slew of great pics. Eventually, you’ll have a stockpile of product shots that you can rely on.”

And a little bit about analytics. 

US CMOs Still Report Making Little Use of Marketing Analytics [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Moreover, the reported contribution of marketing analytics is not only still low, but also not improving. On a 7-point scale (where 7 represents very high contribution to performance and 1 no contribution at all), CMOs rated marketing analytics’ contribution to performance at an average of 3.2, the lowest figure since the question was first asked in August 2012.

To top it off, 7 in 10 CMOs said they do not formally evaluate the quality of marketing analytics. That figure has also not improved in the past 3 years, as two-thirds did not evaluate the quality back in February 2012.”

DukeCMOSurvey-Share-Budget-Spend-Marketing-Analytics-Feb2015

Let us know if we can help with that.

Written by Sarah

February 27th, 2015 at 8:47 am

4 tips for visual content marketing across platforms

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Merle coaster

From our Instagram account.

Whether you’re building or maintaining your brand voice online, cohesiveness is important. You need to create a consistent experience across social media channels, particularly in your visual content marketing tactics. To be successful in any social media channel, you need content that fits that channel. However, it’s time consuming and impractical to create brand new creative for every single social media platform you participate in. So it’s important to strike the balance between sharing carbon content copies on every social channel, and a taking a completely unique approach in each place.

If you don’t know where to start with your cross-channel content marketing, start with these four tips:

1. Know the best practices for images on each platform.

Audiences seem to like different image elements on different platforms; be sure you have the most up-to-date information about what performs well in each place. Get started with 4 tips for creating content that works across social channels (includes a list of resources for best practices on each platform) and see an example of a cross-platform campaign with The best back-to-school campaigns on Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr.

2. But your own analytics should take precedence.

If the best practice for a particular social channel tells you that photos without faces in them perform the best, but your audience engages more with photos that do have faces, then continue to include faces in your content. What your audience likes and responds to is always what you should design your content strategy around. Best practices simply give you a place to start from and something to test against.

3. Know what elements are important to tie your brand together.

Identify the elements you consider a key part of demonstrating the core values of your business and find a way to communicate that visually across platforms. Color schemes, fonts, framing, and even copy placement are all things to consider (consult your style guide, or build one). Tweak until everything feels just right, then make sure to incorporate enough in every new piece to make it clear that it’s your piece.

4. Tailor copy for every platform.

This is about visuals sure, but rarely do we post a visual without any accompanying words. Don’t just write up one caption or paragraph and paste it with the same photo everywhere you have a social presence. Tailor everything to fit what your audience has shown they like in each place. If you don’t know what that is, start testing and be sure to track your audience’s responses.

Written by Sarah

February 24th, 2015 at 9:04 am

The Week in Social Analytics #142

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

How to. 

How to Care for Your Blog When You Are Too Busy to Blog [from Social Media Today; written by Edwin Huertas]

“Learn to listen in on the sentiments and concerns of your audiences and write content that directly address these. You may not win any literary prizes, but I assure you that your audiences will be very, very interested in what you have to say. Tap into the ‘what’s in it for me’ mindset and you will always have interesting things to write about, and you won’t need to spend much time thinking about what to write.”

How to Make Better Visualizations for Your Blog [from Convince and Convert; written by Sujan Patel]

Which styles of visual content work best with which styles of written content.

On content marketing. 

Content Marketing Personalization: Build Relationships At Scale [from B2B Marketing Insider; written by Michael Brenner]

“Marketing cannot continue to be about ads. Ads we tune out. Ads we hate.”

How to Create a Call-to-Action for All of Your Content [from Spin Sucks; written by Gini Dietrich]

“You also want to think about at least one call-to-action:

  • How to place a call-to-action on every piece of owned media you create. This could be social share buttons, a subscription, or the requirement of an email address for download.
  • How to create landing pages where people download your content. These help you track the effectiveness of one particular piece of content.
  • What kinds of content can you offer in exchange for their registration data (that is, email address and phone number).
  • How to build your database: Generate leads, nurture those leads with new and interesting content, and convert those leads to customers.
  • How to bring in your sales team and integrate your efforts with them.”

B2B Content Marketing Update: Goals, Content Types, and More [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“The most commonly cited content marketing challenges are lack of resources / bandwidth to create content (60%) and understanding buyer personas and creating relevant content for each segment (54%). Roughly half also have trouble producing engaging content, coming up with a variety of content, or simply finding the time to product enough content. Lack of budget (27%) and lack of buy-in/vision (16%), though, don’t appear to be real problems.”

Regalix-Most-Important-Elements-Effective-B2B-Content-Feb2015

 Platform-specific pieces. 

There Are Only A Few, But Here’s How Early Adopters Are Using Twitter Video [from Marketing Land; written by Martin Beck]

“Three weeks after the launch of Twitter’s mobile native video feature, most brands are not using it. The best examples are direct answers in Q&As.”

Surprise! Facebook Has Changed the Rules Again For Brands [from Mack Collier]

Remember all of those images you’re supposed to be using for engagement? Don’t use those anymore.

(But we would recommend continuing to share UGC on your Facebook page, even if it does include images.)

Written by Sarah

February 20th, 2015 at 9:03 am

The power of visual storytelling on Twitter (and beyond!)

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It’s no secret that in the never-ending stream of 140-character messages that is Twitter a snappy visual can make yours stand out; Twitter themselves did a study and found that across different content categories adding an image to your tweet boosted engagement in the form of a higher retweet rate.

So simply adding photos to your tweets is a great starting place and one that we’ve discussed before as Twitter has rolled out more image-friendly updates. But if you want to take it further than just adding relevant visuals to tweets, design a way to tell a visual story on Twitter. Put together something where the pieces can stand individually- after all, your tweets will be part of your followers’ stream- but when a prospective follower or curious fan looks at your homepage, they also see a cohesive visual story that communicates your campaign or company values, whatever it is that you’re trying to get across.

What does this look like?

Starbucks is great about using their timeline to tell little mini-stories, and they incorporate their fans and followers in them by retweeting their tweets as well. A great example is a recent celebration of National Croissant Day:

Starbucks visual storytelling Twitter

 

This example also takes it further, by integrating Snapchat. (We’ll talk more about expanding to other platforms in just a bit!)

Keeping things to Twitter, look at the timelines of any major brands you admire and ask yourself what makes their presentation successful or unsuccessful; do their visuals feel cohesive? Do they work together towards telling a single story and letting you know what they can do for you? Figure out how you can answer those questions and provide value to your own fans, followers, and customers.

Take it beyond a campaign.

Twitter shouldn’t just be about selling to your audience; using it like a bullhorn to shout at your fans and followers is unlikely to result in a reciprocal, engaged relationship with them. Use your social presence to tell any number of stories about your brand. Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • Tell the story of how your company came to be
  • Tell the story of how two companies came together as one in a merger, or the story of a rebranding
  • Show off company culture: Share spontaneous images your employees take of one another and let them tell daily office stories in their own words
  • Show off company values: Share the story of a day spent volunteering, or the different charitable things employees do on their own time and how you support them
  • Tell the story of an event or anniversary of your company
  • Tell the story of a partnership of two brands or a brand and a celebrity spokesperson around a campaign

All of these are ways to show off the human side of your brand, in addition to giving your employees some storytelling power.

Take it even beyond Twitter.

Go beyond just adding a photo to your tweets and use photos to tell a story not just on Twitter but across platforms: Tailor your story so that it’s told on your Facebook timeline, on your Tumblr, across your Instagram page. You can choose different parts of your story to tell in each place, if that feels more appropriate for your brand. Don’t be afraid to experiment with your narrative as long as you stay true to your brand values and the voice you’re trying to build or strengthen. 

See an example of each for inspiration: IKEA built a catalog on Instagram last year, Charity: Water mixes in stories from their different well-building campaigns with user-generated stories on their Facebook page (also seen below), and Sephora’s Tumblr acts as a combination catalog and digital magazine repository of inspirational images, tips, and tricks for their followers.

Charity Water FB

One woman even used Pinterest to tell the story of her Imaginary Well-Dressed Toddler, which eventually expanded to a presence on other networks and a book. In that case a powerful visual story became a brand.

Test content types constantly.

Finally, use the engagement levels on the types of visual content you use- images with words superimposed on them, images without words but with captions, etc- to plan content types moving forward. And you’ll want to keep testing; your audience’s tastes will most likely shift over time.

Written by Sarah

February 18th, 2015 at 9:41 am

The Week in Social Analytics #141

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content marketing.

11 Unusual Visual Content Marketing Tips to Drive a Ton of Traffic [from Jeff Bullas dot com; written by Vinay Koshy]

A fantastic, smart, and in-depth look at ways to build out your content marketing strategy.

These Five Essential Habits of Curators Will Make You a Smarter Marketer [from Marketing Profs; written by Rohit Bhargava]

“In other words, curation adds meaning to isolated beautiful things.

Emphasis original.

On your audience. 

Attention is a Precious Commodity: Earn it and Spend it Wisely [from Brian Solis]

“That’s the elusive yet magical nature of this attention economy. And, it’s both a challenge and also an opportunity to compete in it and for it.”

Your marketing success may hinge on Gray Social Media [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

“I would like to propose today that between dark social media and light social media, there is a third category that is rich in undiscovered marketing opportunity — Gray Social Media. These are the small, still voices who are clearly telling us they’re there, but we can’t detect their quiet signals and capture the data.”

How do we make sure the smallest voices are being heard, so we don’t just cater to a noisy minority?

You Can’t Own a Conversation [from SHIFT Communication; written by Scott Monty]

The lesson here is: Don’t be so quick to spread a message that you aren’t aware of how your message might be received. Listen before you speak, always.

“No, you can’t own a conversation. But you can own relationships. And the relationships you create are your defense against missteps and critics.”

On brand values. 

The Value of Brand Values [from We Are Social; written by Simon Kemp]

“. . .what defines a compelling, ‘human’ brand?

We asked some of the world’s leading marketers the same question, and their answers consistently focused on the same traits that define popular, sociable people.”

If you make time to read one whole piece this week, make it this one.

Written by Sarah

February 13th, 2015 at 8:57 am

5 ways to make the most of snapshot reports

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Our snapshot reports are a great way to get some quick analytics about a conversation or topic on Twitter, and we want to help you get the most out of them that you can! Here are five ways to make the most of your snapshots:

1. Maximize your results

Take your snapshot as soon as a tweet chat, event, or event session ends to capture the best data possible. Free snapshots include up to 50 Tweets and $20 full snapshots include up to 1,500 Tweets, both from the past couple days (up to one week back in many cases). The longer you wait to run your report, however, the better chance that you’ll miss the best data.

tweetreach #smchat

 

From our Instagram account

2. Narrow your results

Taking a snapshot of a weekly chat? Use the “since” modifier (example: #RKChat since:2015-01-30 would go in the search bar) to get results from just that day’s chat, and not any anticipatory chatter from the night before. To narrow your search in other ways to get exactly the data you want, check out this full list of advanced operators.

3. Plan your research

Running a few free reports around keywords, topics, or different hashtags can help you narrow your focus and decide which will be worth paying for a full snapshot, or even going Pro if you’ve got that option in your budget.

4. Scope out the competition

A snapshot of an account can give you a quick idea of that account’s recent activity; which tweets are the most retweeted? Is that the same kind of content you should be looking at and sharing? It’s a great jumping off point for planning your content calendar.

5. Scope out influencers

Which brands and personal brands have the best tone and approach to Twitter in your industry? Run a few snapshots to find common threads and use them to enhance your Twitter content strategy moving forward.

Give it a try! Run your own free snapshot report right now.

Written by Sarah

February 12th, 2015 at 8:36 am

Projects now available in all Union Metrics accounts!

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You’ve had projects functionality for a long time with a TweetReach Pro subscription, but now projects is available in all Union Metrics accounts! Learn how to get projects set up here

Projects enable you to selectively share Trackers with clients and colleagues, seamlessly support multiple campaigns, and easily manage multiple users’ access. With projects, you can:

  • Group related Trackers together
  • Share select Trackers with clients or colleagues
  • Manage user access and permissions
  • Create guest access for one or more Trackers
  • View project-level dashboards and insights

 

Union Metrics Projects

Why group related Trackers together? This gives you the ability to create a top-level dashboard to view campaign performance at a glance, monitor your competitors for share of voice reporting, easily manage multiple campaigns or clients, and more.

And with this feature, you can also control individual user access to specific data – selectively invite users to view only certain Trackers, manage user read and write permissions across your account, and more.

Try it yourself! Log into your Union Metrics account now.

Written by Sarah

February 11th, 2015 at 10:44 am

The Week in Social Analytics #140

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content marketing 

7 Types of Content You Still Aren’t Creating But Should Be [from Business2Community; written by Arnie Kuenn]

“. . .it’s more efficient and effective in the long term (and often times required for larger organizations) to take a broader view – to create content that can come to life in various formats, across many different platforms, and that can address multiple audiences.”

Do You Follow the 6 Content Curation Principles? [from PRblog; written by Kevin Dugan]

Tumblr is one of the best platforms for curating fantastic original content to share alongside your own original content. Here are six principles to consider to get you started on your curation journey:

content curation principles

The Super Bowl of Content Marketing Audits – Optimized, Socialized & Integrated [from Top Rank Online Marketing Blog; written by Lee Odden]

The big mistake: (But not as big as throwing a pass on 2nd down and 1 yard to go) The Discovery, Assess and Recommend process for Audits is often treated as a one-time event, usually at the start of an internal effort to re-align marketing efforts or at the start of an engagement with an outside digital marketing agency. That’s a mistake. Depending on the program, audits should be part of a quarterly or annual process to evaluate program performance.”

Emphasis original.

On understanding your audience 

Be Effective by Being Authentic [from Marketing Profs; written by Gillian Vallee]

“To convey honesty that compels customers to act, effectual marketing messaging goes beyond being true and correct. To resonate as genuine, a brand must demonstrate accessibility, inclusiveness, and familiarity.

Ask these questions often:

  • What promises are we making? How are we delivering on those promises?
  • How have we demonstrated our interest and investment into our customers’ needs and desires?
  • Are we relatable?
  • How have we let the customer ‘in’?
  • Prove that there is truth in advertising.”

I don’t know my online audience and neither do you [from grow; written by Mark Schaefer]

Mark raises some interesting questions and provides definite food for thought in this piece:

“I think this poses some interesting questions about marketing to an online audience.

  1. We are only measuring the loud people, a vast minority of those who love us. What is the danger of forming a marketing plan around a group that is probably less than 5 percent of the total audience?
  2. We cannot mistake ‘quiet’ for irrelevant. There is a huge number of passionate fans out there who just never tell us they’re passionate fans! They are a powerful group.
  3. If we can’t accurately measure our content audience through normal analytics channels, what CAN we do to more accurately know who’s out there sharing our content in some way?”

What do you think?

B2B Marketers Seek to Better Understand the Customer Buying Journey [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Of note, certain mobile channels are slated for decreases: 4 in 10 respondents plan to cut spending for mobile QR codes and for mobile messaging, while 3 in 10 plan to reduce their mobile app spending.”

Regalix-Important-Factors-B2B-Future-Digital-Initiatives-Feb2015

 

Written by Sarah

February 6th, 2015 at 8:25 am

Superhero Super Bowl Bet: The stunning conclusion

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Since Star-Lord and Captain America set a wager on Twitter about whose team would win last night’s Big Game, we’ve been watching them and the rest of the social media sphere egg each other on good-naturedly. Good Morning America got into the discussion last week, and some other celebrities even asked to get in on the action:

Since January 19th, 182k tweets and counting have been made around this superhero Super Bowl bet by 93k contributors (and counting). The two most retweeted tweets came from Captain America and Star-Lord themselves wrapping up the bet last night on Twitter:

So while in the end Captain America won his bet, Christopher’s Haven and Seattle Children’s Hospital are the real winners with all of the donations made in honor of this bet and the upcoming superhero visits to the kids.

Stay tuned for more on the rest of Super Bowl XLIX!

Written by Sarah

February 2nd, 2015 at 9:46 am

Superhero Super Bowl Bet: Updated

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The Big Game is Sunday, so how’s that big Superhero Super Bowl Bet going? Since the bet started, more than 50k people have posted more than 88k tweets, and counting.

Good Morning America has joined the conversation on Twitter, and they’re asking their fans and followers to retweet the superhero whose team they want to see win on Sunday. Want to wager who’s winning in terms of retweets as of this writing?

It’s Captain America, with over 4k retweets on “his” GMA tweet to over 2k retweets on Star-Lord’s.

Keep an eye on the conversation on Twitter with the three most popular hashtags:

  1. #SuperBowl
  2. #GMASuperBowl
  3. #SuperBowlBound

The tides can always turn on Sunday. Will you be watching?

Written by Sarah

January 31st, 2015 at 9:00 am